Unlike Any Other

When Chef de Cuisine Brandon Brumback and Executive Pastry Chef Ariana Quant first dreamed up Uchi’s first highly anticipated Denver location, giving locals an experience unlike any other was at the top of their to-do list. 

“A truly unique one,” stated Brandon when we asked the type of experience that diners can expect when they take a seat in Uchi. “They can expect an eclectic blend of Japanese inspired food with some European and South American influences. We have a lot of influences from all over the world—so I think that the cuisine is unique. It’s a fun dining experience, very interactive.”

And as far as Denver dining goes, it’s fair to say that “unique” is exactly what this new space is bringing to the community. Uchi—the brainchild of James Beard Award-winning Chef-Owner Tyson Cole, hails from Texas, where Tyson built his empire by sourcing unmatched seafood and expertly presenting it with finesse. In addition to phenomenal sushi bars, Uchi and sister restaurant Uchiko grew to be known for excellence in the kitchen. With unique dishes like the machi cure (smoked yellowtail and Marcona almonds, served atop a yuka chip so crisp that the plate should be called sushi nachos) and Brandon’s personal homage to Colorado with local lamb and jade rice—Uchi is bringing a blend of both culture and flavor to Denver’s diners. 

These, in addition to staple menu items like the esteemed Hama Chili—a dish that Brandon describes as “very simple, but one of the most complex tasting dishes that [he’s] had,” make Uchi’s nearly 75 item menu one of the more unique ones in the Mile High dining scene. And though Uchi’s menu is fully outfitted with every dish that a fish lover could possibly want, the staff is fully equipped to give those who don’t fancy seafood an unmatched experience by guiding them through the extensive vegetarian options. With dishes like the kinoko, a seasonal brown butter glazed mushroom served atop rice (nigiri style) and even a six-course vegetarian tasting menu, Uchi has made itself approachable to all types of eaters. They’ve even gone as far as to team up with local farm Altius to grow a majority of the restaurant’s lettuces, herbs and greenery, right above guests heads. Encompassing the entire second floor of Uchi’s space sits a massive greenhouse—and run by local farm Altius, this space is producing homegrown produce for Uchi, which Brandon describes as “truly amazing.”  

“It’s the largest vertical grow in Colorado or maybe even the country,” explained Brandon. “And this is their first growth of everything, so this has taken about six to seven weeks to come to fruition and we really just had our first large purchase from them last week. They’re, amazing and honestly, they’re like half the price of a lot of the companies that we were using.”

From the dishes to the decor—this new space has managed to bring both finesse and authenticity to Denver. The clean lines and dark modern design of the interior ooze elegance and sex appeal, while the dishes both embody detail and indulgence. To be able to come into a rapidly growing city like Denver and make an obvious splash is a feat in and of itself. To do that while both retaining your own unique flare and giving recognition to the region that your entering is truly impressive and makes us realize Brandon was right when he said that Uchi is “unlike any other.”