Month of Modern 1

Cultivating a conversation about Colorado modern, all month long.

During October, Boulder will be alive with Month of Modern (MoM). Founded as a celebration of architecture, design, lifestyle, art and culture—MoM’s mission is to cultivate a conversation about Colorado modern and present the region as one of the nation’s most vibrant hubs of modern design.

This unique month-long event—presented by HMH Architecture + Interiors and Jennifer Egbert Modern Luxury Real Estate—offers inspiring and engaging sessions from top minds in modern design, as well as, continuing education opportunities for different design disciplines.

We sat down with co-founders of the event, Harvey Hine and Cherie Goff of HMH Architecture, to get the deets on what we can expect this year.

WHY DID YOU START THE MONTH OF MODERN (MOM)?

Month of Modern started as an idea to celebrate the 25th anniversary of HMH Architecture + Interiors and give back to our community. With the help of Annabel Media, MoM has grown into something much more significant.

We believe that Boulder (and Colorado in general) has pent-up 
interest in modern design, and there is a thirst for an exchange of ideas. This theory has proven true by the enthusiasm Month of Modern has received for the past three years. We all have our own ideas, and this is what makes the topic of “Colorado Modern” so interesting.

THIS WILL BE THE FOURTH YEAR THAT MOM TAKES PLACE IN BOULDER. WHAT ARE SOME CHANGES WE WILL SEE?

2017 will see a shift in programming, with intriguing formats designed to include architects and design professionals, along with the design enthusiast public. Attendees can expect to find themselves immersed in new ideas for modern living via featured speakers, fire-side chats and thought-provoking panels. We want to celebrate the businesses, organizations and individuals who elevate industry standards and drive the modern movement forward. We hope that the conversations started here will create a better awareness of Colorado modern design and design as a whole.

TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF MODERN IN COLORADO?

Colorado has a rich history of modern design, but it has always taken a back seat to “mountain and “rustic” design. The first pendulum swing happened in the 1950s and 60s when Boulder became a hotbed of good modern architecture—the influence of Charles Haertling, Roger Easton, Hobart Wagener, Gale Abels, James Hunter—can be seen and felt throughout the city, with clean, evocative designs sitting side by side with Victorian homes, Craftsman bungalows and 1970s office buildings.

By the 1970’s Boulder had ugly modern strip malls, elementary schools and government buildings. The population reacted with a return to historicism, and the Pearl street mall was built. Buildings on the mall that were made modern in the 60’s were converted back to traditional.

With so many people moving to the region and seeking to simplify their lifestyles, Colorado is seeing a resurgence of modern design. One of the core principles of modern design is to create a connection to nature. This speaks to the heart of the Colorado population who love the outdoors. Large windows, big overhangs and bringing exterior materials, like stone and cedar siding, indoors creates a physical and visual connection to what we love.

WHAT IS THE DIRECTION IS THE CURRENT 
“COLORADO MODERN” MOVEMENT?

The marriage of warmer materials with the principles of modern (clean lines, simple forms, and lots of light), sustainability and indoor/outdoor connections is driving the future of Colorado modern design.

However, as it has become more popular, some of the principles are getting lost. We see examples around town where flat roofs and large windows are used, but they are broken up with too many jogs, and too many different materials.  These may look modern at a glance, but they have lost the core principle of modern which is clean lines and simple forms.

DEFINE YOUR IDEA OF WHAT MODERN IS?

Modern follows key principles: rectangular forms with articulation of horizontal and vertical lines, open floor plans, the expression of material connections that are not covered by decorative trim, and large spans of glass the blur the lines between outside and inside.

MonthOfModern.com